Volume 1, Number 1, 2019

 

Sleep Deprivation as a Function of Bully-Induced Conflict Interruptions of College Students’ Peaceful Sleep

Sleep Deprivation as a Function of Bully-Induced Conflict Interruptions of College Students’ Peaceful Sleep: Bullying creates stress from conflict in interpersonal relationships, and has a negative impact on the mental and physiological health of victims, including depression and anxiety. However, little attention has been focused on the impact of bullying on the physical health of victims. The purpose of this study was to examine whether bullying had a negative impact on victims’ quality of sleep, since lack of sleep can cause diseases, depression, and even suicidal tendency. Participants of this study included 418 undergraduate students at a southeastern university in the United States. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) was conducted in order to evaluate how types of traditional bullying associated with sleep disturbance. The results indicated that interpersonal conflict associated with traditional bullying in the form of verbal and social victimization correlated with the sleep quality of victims. Implications of this study are discussed, along with limitations and suggestions for future research.

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TRAIT IMPULSIVITY

The relationship between trait impulsivity -This study leveraged a recent theoretical distinction between sensation seeking and impulsivity (Zuckerman & Glicksohn, 2016) to investigate if the relationship between trait impulsivity and cyberbullying behavior is accounted for by sensation seeking. College students (N = 500) participated in an online survey and completed measures of impulsivity, sensation seeking, empathy, cyberbullying toward known and unknown targets, and demographics. Conditional process modeling revealed a direct and indirect pathway for cyberbullying of known targets, such that higher impulsivity led to increased cyberbullying toward known targets, but this was accounted for by increased sensation seeking. Additionally, conditional process modeling revealed an indirect pathway for cyberbullying of unknown targets, such that higher impulsivity led to increased cyberbullying toward unknown targets, via increased sensation seeking. Empathy was not related to sensation seeking or cyberbullying, but was weakly correlated with impulsivity. Results and implications of findings are discussed.

 

COLLEGE ATHLETES’ VIEWS ON SPORTS BULLYING AND HAZING 

College Athletes’ Views on Sports Bullying and Hazing– In order to understand bullying and hazing in sports more research is needed.  The goal of this study was to obtain information about college athletes’ attitudes about sports hazing and bullying.  Participants were 103 Division 1 athletes. They completed a survey assessing attitudes about sports hazing and bullying as well as the prevalence of behaviors related to the belief that sports hazing is a part of the sports culture.  Results demonstrate that athletes have mixed attitudes about sports hazing and bullying; while many believe that sports hazing can cause negative damage to an athlete, many also believe that a little hazing is okay as long as no one gets hurts.  Furthermore, the results reveal that many behaviors and attitudes about sports bullying and hazing are related to the belief that hazing is a part of the sports culture. Implications for athletes and coaches are discussed.

 ATTITUDES OF COLLEGE STUDENTS TO CYBERBULLYING IN HIGHER EDUCATION 

Attitudes of College Students to Cyberbullying in Higher Education

The use of electronic and information technology is a form of communication that manifests itself in several ways, namely, social online communication, instant messaging and texting. Instead of people communicating in the traditional manner, using eye-to-eye contact, social networking sites have become places to reinforce friendships and to make new friends. However, when social communication sites become misused by an individual, after one places private information on the Internet, this can be mishandled by others; especially where someone unknowingly chats with a person who might be a predator; or when people can post mean, intimidating rumors about someone. In these cases, this communication is unwelcome and dangerous.

 BATTLING THE BULLIES: A TEXT ANALYSIS OF STUDENT INTERVENTIONS AT UNIVERSITY

Battling the Bullies: A Text Analysis of Student Interventions at University- 

An unfortunate, yet prevalent peril at University is the role of peer association and bullying. Research indicates that often, bullying occurs within a social context (O’Connell, Pepler, & Craig, 1999). This study used linguistic inquiry and word count (LIWC) text analysis to explore university students’ perception of bullying intervention through essay writing. Student subjects lived in the same residence learning community (RLC) and were enrolled in the same first year seminar (FYS). It was hypothesized problem solving and bullying resolution would significantly differ before and after the course was completed. Pretest, students exhibited traits identified in the variables “Clout” and “Tone.” In posttest, students exhibited dominant traits “Authentic” and “Tone.” It is suggested social identity among student residents is a constant. Students initially intervened with bravado and confidence. Knowledge gained throughout the FYS course, and within the RLC, led to increased strategic thinking, then transparency, in better understanding the core dysfunction in the bullying persona.

BULLYING: COLLEGE STUDENTS’ VIEWS AND EXPERIENCES 

Bullying: College Students’ Views and Experiences

The primary focus of this study was to examine college students’ views about bullying and to learn about their previous experiences with bullying.  Participants for this study consisted of 108 undergraduate students at Manhattan College. They complete a survey assessing general attitudes and experiences with bullying and responses to a hypothetical bullying scenario.  Participants who reported being bullying in school completed an additional 10 questions assessing their experience. The results demonstrate that college students were impacted by bullying during their middle and high school years with a fairly large percentage reporting that the early experience of bullying still affects them today.  The majority of college students believe that the prevalence of bullying has increased and also believe it is taken more seriously by parents today. Lastly, participants would help a bullying victim with effective strategies.

Permanent link to this article: http://sites.tamuc.edu/bullyingjournal/

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Sleep Deprivation as a Function of Bully-Induced Conflict: Interruptions of College Students’ Peaceful Sleep

Elena V. Chudnovskaya, Ph.D. Diane M. Millette, Ed.D. Michael J. Beatty, Ph.D. Abstract Bullying creates stress from conflict in interpersonal relationships, and has a negative impact on the mental and physiological health of victims, including depression and anxiety. However, little attention has been focused on the impact of bullying on the physical health of victims. …

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Bullying: College Students’ Views and Experiences

Martha Mendez-Baldwin Manhattan College Bullying: College Students’ Views and Experiences Abstract The primary focus of this study was to examine college students’ views about bullying and to learn about their previous experiences with bullying.  Participants for this study consisted of 108 undergraduate students at Manhattan College. They complete a survey assessing general attitudes and experiences …

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Battling the Bullies: A Text Analysis of Student Interventions at University

Thomas Mueller McKenzi Wallin Appalachian State University  Battling the Bullies: A Text Analysis of Student Interventions at University Abstract An unfortunate, yet prevalent peril at University is the role of peer association and bullying. Research indicates that often, bullying occurs within a social context (O’Connell, Pepler, & Craig, 1999). This study used linguistic inquiry and …

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Cyberbullying & Substance Abuse

Cyberbullying & Substance Abuse – According to the Megan Meier Foundation—a foundation created by Tina Meier after her 13-year-old daughter, Megan, took her own life as a result of being cyberbullied—approximately 34 percent of all school-aged kids have endured cyberbullying at some point in their lives.

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